Thursday, May 21, 2020

The Bill Of Rights Of The United States Constitution Essay

The Bill of Rights contains the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. These first ten amendments were ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights define and interpret constitutional rights and protections that are guaranteed under the US Constitution. The following text is a transcription of the first ten amendments to the Constitution in their original form. â€Å"Amendment I Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Amendment II A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. Amendment III No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be pres cribed by law. Amendment IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Amendment V No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a GrandShow MoreRelatedThe Bill Of Rights Of The United States Constitution914 Words   |  4 PagesWhat is a bill of rights? What is an amendment? How are the different? A bill of rights is a formality such as the Declaration of Independence and it is the outline of what the citizens feel their born rights are as people of a union. An amendment is the changing or altering of a legal or civil document. Specifically amendments in the United States Constitution include the changing or detailing of w hat the people need. These two phrases differ in what their purposes are. The bill of rights was setRead MoreThe Bill Of Rights Of The United States Constitution1501 Words   |  7 Pages Introduction. The Bill of Rights is a historical documents that has the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. The purpose of the Bill of Rights is for greater constitutional protection for our own individual liberties. It has a list of specific prohibitions on government power. There were only 12 amendments originally for the state legislatures and only picked 10 for all the states and those are known as the Bill of Rights, but there are 27 amendments in total. AmendmentsRead MoreThe Bill Of Rights Of The United States Constitution Essay1866 Words   |  8 PagesThe bill of rights is the ten amendments to the United States Constitution, approved on December 15, 1791, and written by James Madison as a response to calls from several States for greater constitutional protection for Individual freedoms, such as freedom of Speech. It creates many legal principles that have had a crucial effect on law and society. The bill of right was added to the Constitution of the United States to assurance the protection of the people from the government. It was served toRead MoreThe Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution Essay753 Words   |  4 PagesThe Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution has ten amendments in the first part. The 2nd amendment in the Bill of Rights is The Right to Keep and Bear Arms. The 2nd amendment The Right to Keep and Bear Arms states that â€Å"A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed† (USConstitution). The 2nd second amendment allows any United States citizen to own any type of arm. It allows you to be armedRead MoreGeneral George Washington And His Continental Army Had1643 Words   |  7 Pagesdefeated the English Army. In 1776, the founding fathers of the United States of America signed the Declaration of Independence, according to ushistory.org 60 delegates signed the document that granted the country we know today as the United States free from British rule.Some of the men that inked their name into American history were Thomas Jefferson. Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and John Hancock. From that point on the United States was an independent nation. Being an independent nation means theRead MoreUnited States Of America Constitution845 Words   |  4 PagesUnited States of America Constitution The United States of America is by far the most successful Republic governed country in the world and has managed to survive for over 223 years. The success can be contributed to the foundation that the farmers created, which is the United States Constitution. The framers knew that with time the needs of the people would evolve due to changes in society. That being said, they knew that the regulations in the Constitution would need to be adjusted or expandedRead MoreThe Bill Of Rights By James Madison And Influenced By George Mason1078 Words   |  5 Pageswhich the bill of rights was written by James Madison and influenced by George Mason was the United State of America in the late seventeen hundreds. The bill of rights has many differences from an amendment. The constitution is the bases of the bill of rights. The federalist and the anti federalist had different views in which the bill of rights came into play. Many people in the United States did not want a government that reflec ted the England government. One will look at what is the bill of rightsRead MoreGovernmental Foundation in the Declaration of Independence Essay867 Words   |  4 Pages On July 4, 1776, the United States of Americas Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Second Continental Congress, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This document, primarily written by Thomas Jefferson, announced that the thirteen colonies were declaring their independence and, in doing so, were independent states apart from the British Empire. The Declaration of Independence is comprised mainly of colonial grievances and assertions of human rights. The Declaration of Independence formed aRead MoreUnited States Vs. Virginia Constitution. In A Quick Observation,1115 Words   |  5 PagesUnited States VS. Virginia Constitution In a quick observation, it may be easy to observe that the Constitution of Virginia is much larger in length and detail than the United States Constitution. There are many differences between these two constitutions besides the authors or contributors being that James Madison contributed to both, however, he was not the complete author of the Constitution of Virginia (Constitutions of Virginia). Both Constitutions have the same idea in which it holds threeRead MoreThe United States Bill Of Rights882 Words   |  4 PagesThe United States Bill of Rights was created in September 25, 1789 and ratified December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights are the first ten amendments to the Constitution that were established to defend our rights as individuals and as American citizens. The Bill of Rights describes the rights of its people. The first four articles of the amendments deal specifically with the balance of power between the federal government and state government. There were some people who opposed to the Constitution because

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Buddhism and the Four Noble Truths Essay - 1769 Words

Tilopa once said, â€Å"It is not the outer objects that entangle us. It is the inner clinging that entangles us.† Over 2500 years ago, Buddha outlined the framework for Buddhist thought in which he declared that he taught suffering, its origin, cessation and path. The four noble truths contain the basis of Buddha’s ideas which he attained while meditating under a bodhi tree, which would later become a Buddhist symbol. While Buddhism is not practiced by many, its affect in the world can be seen in the utilization of the four noble truths that Buddha was enlightened with. By accepting the four noble truths, we are able to identify, heal, and be set free from a life of suffering. To begin with, the common bond humans share with each other in†¦show more content†¦The poor man surprisingly walked around peacefully, and this gave the first Buddha the idea of roaming around, abstaining from indulgences, and trying to discover a cure all to end pain and misery. (Chane y, 3.) To continue, the Buddha said in his teaching that life is dukkha, the exact translation of the word to English is unknown, but most believe it is suffering. However, even things such as happiness and success eventually become dukkha. According to Buddha, life is impermanent and is constantly changing. Buddha Gotama said to his disciples, â€Å"Impermanent, subject to change, are component things. Strive on with heedfulness† (Thera, 6). This simply means that life and anything in the world is constantly changing. For example, you could win an award for being an outstanding athlete, but the happiness that brings is only short term. Life is dukkha and the happiness it brings will quickly subside. Buddha wanted his followers to realize the impermanence of life, and the dynamic changes that happen on a daily basis. This learning experience would provide a key into understanding what suffering is, and why every human shares the same common theme of suffering. As humans, we c ontinually push ourselves to reach goals that we set for ourselves. However, the Buddha believes that this thirst for success only disappoints us because we are constantly trying to push barriers that we sometimes cannot physicallyShow MoreRelatedThe Four Noble Truths Of Buddhism760 Words   |  4 PagesAlyssa Hayes Professor Wayne Knight 2/27/2017 Hum 10 Tuesday Buddhism The four noble truths The Buddhists strongly believed in the four noble truths which are the foundation of Buddhism. The first noble truth, is the truth of suffering or (dukkha). The Pali word â€Å"dukkha† can be described using the term â€Å"temporary†. Things that are painful and things that are pleasurable are considered dukkha because they are temporary and do not last forever. In relation to human life, Buddhists believe that lifeRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths Of Buddhism1533 Words   |  7 PagesCritically discuss the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, explaining the reasons or arguments given by Buddhism to support these Truths and discussing at least one objection that could be raised against the first Noble Truth and one objection that could be raised against the second Noble Truth. Buddhism see’s the Four Noble Truths as the Buddha’s way of explaining the truth of the human condition and are described as the essence of His teachings. The Four Noble Truths play an important part in understandingRead MoreBuddhism : The Four Noble Truths859 Words   |  4 Pagesspiritual practices, and traditions, Buddhism. Some of the spiritual practice of Buddhism have largely based teachings today across the world. The teachings consisted of â€Å"The Eightfold Paths,† â€Å"The Four Noble Truths† and some other breathings or meditations. The religion has taught their followers to shadow their own journey in order to assist them in their own lightning way. Some of the practice teachings include meditation and breathing exercise, and chant. Buddhism is a religion that has been aroundRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths Of Buddhism1642 Words   |  7 PagesMy Enlightenment Ever since I was a sophomore in high school, I have always had a particular interest in Buddhism. I have embraced the similarities that I have found within myself and the Buddhism religion. A few years ago, I was in a dark state of mind after my father had passed away. During my healing process, I felt that I was awakened in which I found my determination to search for my enlightenment. I spent a few weeks searching for what I thought was my path to end my suffering. I needed toRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths Of Buddhism1635 Words   |  7 PagesIn the history of Buddhism, suffering has always remained a key concept as it is the main reason for using Buddhist principles and practices to relieve ourselves from it. The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism inform us of the following principles: suffering exists in life, there is a cause to our suffering, there is an end to our suffering, and following the eightfold path can relieve our suffering. Traditional forms of Buddhism suggest that we c an overcome suffering by attaining Nirvana, or the stateRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths of Buddhism1018 Words   |  4 PagesDiscussion 1: Desire. Please respond to the following: Explain what you think your life would be like if you did not make decisions or act on the basis of your desires. The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism suggest that suffering is caused by desire, and to eliminate suffering, it is essential to eliminate desire. This concept is so simple, and yet so difficult to achieve. From the moment we wake up, desire consumes our thoughts. Desire can inspire us to achieve great things, but desire can alsoRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths Of Buddhism1248 Words   |  5 PagesIn Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, the four Noble Truths of Buddhism are revealed throughout the journey of Siddhartha. The Four Noble Truths include: Life means suffering, the origin of suffering is attachment, the cessation of suffering is attainable, and the path to the cessation of suffering. Siddhartha discovers that in order to reach enlightenment, one must have experiences and struggle through these Noble Truths firsthand. The first Noble Truth â€Å"Life means suffering† is shown throughout Siddhartha’sRead MoreBuddhism: Happiness and The Four Noble Truths1442 Words   |  6 Pagespermanent. Gautama’s renunciation of an unsatisfying existence is a great model for anyone following the Buddha’s path. Gautama himself tried to find a teacher to help him find peace, however; this proved ineffective (Haught 47). Therefore, followers of Buddhism must find the way to peace themselves. No one can help them in this quest. One has to experience life on their own; following the rules of others will do nothing to bring about one’s own consciousness. For six years, Gautama joined a group of monksRead MoreThe Four Noble Truths of Buddhism Essay791 Words   |  4 PagesThe Four Noble Truths of Buddhism #65279; Dukkha is the first of the four noble truths of Buddhism. The word means suffering, but just to state suffering as the entirety of the first noble truth, is not enough because the expression of dukkha is the first truth that is needed for salvation. Moreover, dukkha is the conclusion of a logical chain of ideas that explains the life and death cycle of mankind. Before a person recognizes the truth of dukkha, he lives in a space of ignoranceRead MoreDiscussion of the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism2489 Words   |  10 PagesQ2. Outline and discuss the four noble truths: is the Buddhist view of existence optimistic or pessimistic? The question of the Buddhist view of existence being optimistic or pessimistic is one which is many have an opinion on. It could be said that the four noble truths provide the views of the Buddha in the way that life is led and more importantly, should be led. Certainly, the end goal is clearly optimistic, the attainment of spiritual enlightenment, or nirvana. However, the Buddhist view

Career Satisfaction Free Essays

Human beings possess the unique psychological ability to self-reflect. Few human experiences and behaviors define the self and allow us to characterize ourselves within the social world more than work and career. Career choice affects socioeconomic status, friends, political values, residence location, childcare, Job stress, and many other aspects of life. We will write a custom essay sample on Career Satisfaction or any similar topic only for you Order Now And while income is important in both career selection and career longevity, so are achievement, recognition, satisfaction, security, and challenge. A person has a choice in calling work a Job or a career. This decision usually accounts for factors such as time and interest the person puts into the work. In most cases, the work will be considered a Job when the person has Just begun working, or the person has no interest in the work and only works for the pay. Generally, the term career will be used when a person expresses interest and seeks out a specific type of work, or has spent a considerable amount of time working in that area. A Job may be Just something a person does to pay bills, where as a career is something a person chooses, prepares for, and incorporates into life and self- concept. I work as a mechanical engineer in the United States Navy. I showed interest in this line of work, sought it out, and have been working in the same area for thirteen years. By definition, my work is a career; therefore, I have been calling It as such. I plan to continue working in my career choice, advancing within the Navy’s ranks and ultimately retiring. After the Navy, I Intend to start another career In the civilian sector. I haven’t chosen whether I will continue In the engineering field or pursue something completely different. A lot can change In the years to come before tiring from the Navy, so I am keeping my options open by bettering my r ©sum © every chance I get. I chose this career for three reasons: service, stability, and structure. When I Joined the Navy, I wanted to serve my country. I felt honor In being a part of something bigger than myself. Serving In the military Is satisfying enough for me; however, I have a wife and kids. My choice to continue to serve In the Navy Is based on how my career affects my family. I place high Importance on stability and structure. The Navy can be a very stable career If a person possesses the right abilities and wants It to be. From the beginning of my enlistment, I wanted to make a career In the Navy and have worked to the best of my ablest. Because of this, I believe my career Is very stable and I have since served thirteen years. The structure within the Navy Is well defined. Promotion guldens are made available and clear, so I know exactly what I should do In order to get advanced. Being a part of something for the greater good, having stability, and structure provide for an overall career satisfaction. Work Is obviously a necessity In order to support a family. If I have to work, I may as well enjoy what I do. I have luckily been able to continue a career In the area I take pleasure and excel In. My personality traits fit the work that I do, and I have Identified the traits I would Like to Improve on In order to continually develop my career. I am satisfied with what I have chosen. I am looking forward to the changes that will soon come as I progress In work and life. Career Satisfaction By red rocketed concept. I work as a mechanical engineer in the United States Navy. I showed thirteen years. By definition, my work is a career; therefore, I have been calling it as such. I plan to continue working in my career choice, advancing within the Navy’s ranks and ultimately retiring. After the Navy, I intend to start another career in the civilian sector. I haven’t chosen whether I will continue in the engineering field or pursue something completely different. A lot can change in the years to come before retiring from the Navy, so I am keeping my options open by bettering my r ©sum © structure. When I Joined the Navy, I wanted to serve my country. I felt honor in being part of something bigger than myself. Serving in the military is satisfying enough for me; however, I have a wife and kids. My choice to continue to serve in the Navy is based on how my career affects my family. I place high importance on stability and structure. The Navy can be a very stable career if a person possesses the right abilities and wants it to be. From the beginning of my enlistment, I wanted to make a career in the Navy and have worked to the best of my abilities. Because of this, I believe my career is very stable and I have since served thirteen years. The structure within the Navy is well defined. Promotion guidelines are made available and clear, so I know exactly what I should do in order to get advanced. Being a part of something for the greater good, having stability, and structure provide for an overall career satisfaction. Work is obviously a necessity in order to support a family. If I career in the area I take pleasure and excel in. My personality traits fit the work that I do, and I have identified the traits I would like to improve on in order to continually the changes that will soon come as I progress in work and life. How to cite Career Satisfaction, Papers

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Puerto Rico Essays - Insular Areas Of The United States,

Puerto Rico Puerto Rico, many good things come from there. Beautiful beaches, beautiful women, and a beautiful culture. However, one thing that does not come from Puerto Rico is money, tax dollars to be exact. Why is it that the United States sends millions of dollars in financial aid to Puerto Rico and nothing comes back? The Puerto Ricans are a commonwealth, not a state, that's why. Fifty years ago a commonwealth was more of a protected country rather than a state. Today, however, a commonwealth is equivalent to a leech, a moocher. Puerto Rico basically rules itself, it has its own form of government, and it has its own industry, so why does it need the United States? Puerto Rico needs the United States because the United States equals free money. The US ships millions of dollars in aid to Puerto Rico with nothing coming back in return. Why is that? It's because technically, a commonwealth has the same basic rights as a state. There are a few exceptions though. First, it's citizens are not true citizens of the United States. Second, it's citizens cannot vote in American national elections. (However, this is not a real problem because the Puerto Ricans can vote in their own elections and the US legislature does not have a huge amount of effect on Puerto Rico.) The pluses to being a common wealth of the United States of America are numerous. The largest is that the Puerto Ricans receive all the same aid as any other United States citizen. They can receive welfare, Medicare, and everything other federal aid program without having to pay taxes. What kind of deal is that? They get everything for nothing? That's is definitely not a good deal. Has anything ever been done to change it? As a matter of fact, every certain number of years, The Puerto Rican pubic votes on whether or not it wants to accept the United States' offer of citizenship, and what do you think they do? It's a no-brainer. They, just like anyone else in the world, votes down statehood each and every time the vote comes up. After all, if I could get free money and not have to do anything in return, I would not jeopardize it either.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Employee Rights Supreme Court essays

Employee Rights Supreme Court essays Saint Clair Adams had been hired as a sales counselor by Circuit City Stores, Inc., in California. As a condition of employment, he was required to sign an agreement that any disputes that arose between Adams and his employer would be settled by arbitration. Despite that, Adams sued Circuit City Stores, Inc., in state court for various discrimination complaints. The Ninth Court of Appeals in California held that "Title VII disputes cannot be made subject to compulsory arbitration agreements" as they do not constitute interstate commerce' as specified in the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA). (King, 2001, Jones Day Web site) The facts in the case, as it began, are simple: Adams signed an employment contract that demanded arbitration rather than lawsuits to settle issues between employer and employee. When such an issue arose, however, Adams decided to pursue it in court rather than seek arbitration. Circuit City Stores, Inc., acted to compel Adams to enter into arbitration. The Ninth Circuit Court, contrary to the majority of other Circuit Courts, held that the FAA was written in such a way as to exclude all employment agreements from the reach of the demands of the FAA. The Supreme Court reversed the Ninth Circuit Court's decision, saying that in fact the only agreements not subject to arbitration under FAA pertained to seamen and When the case got to the Supreme Court, it was clear that Adams wanted the Court to find with the Ninth Circuit Court, which would open the way for Adams to litigate the employment issues. Circuit City Stores, Inc., wanted the Court to reverse the Ninth Circuit Court so that it could settle the dispute through arbitration. At that point, the facts of the case as originally filed were almost irrelevant. It did not matter what the specific EEOC violation by Circuit City Stores, Inc. might have been. What mattered at that point w...

Monday, March 2, 2020

Abolitionist Pamphlet Campaign

Abolitionist Pamphlet Campaign In the summer of 1835 the growing abolitionist movement attempted to influence public opinion in the slave states by mailing thousands of anti-slavery pamphlets to addresses in the South. The material inflamed southerners, who broke into post offices, seized bags of mail containing the pamphlets, and made a spectacle of burning the pamphlets in the streets as mobs cheered. The interference with the postal system created a crisis at the federal level. And the battle over use of the mails  illuminated how the issue of slavery was splitting the nation decades before the Civil War. In the North, calls to censor the mails were naturally seen as a violation of Constitutional rights. In the slave states of the South, the literature produced by the American Anti-Slavery Society was viewed as a dire threat to southern society. On a practical level, the local postmaster in Charleston, South Carolina, requested guidance from the postmaster general in Washington, who essentially dodged the issue. After a spasm of demonstrations in the South, in which effigies representing abolitionist leaders were burned as anti-slavery pamphlets were thrown into bonfires, the battleground moved on to the halls of Congress. President Andrew Jackson  even mentioned the mailing of the pamphlets in his annual message to Congress (the forerunner of the State of the Union Address). Jackson advocated suppressing the literature by having federal authorities censor the mails. Yet his approach was challenged by an eternal rival, Senator John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, who advocated for local censorship of federal mail. In the end, the campaign of the abolitionists to mail pamphlets southward was essentially abandoned as being impractical. So the immediate issue of censoring the mails died out. And the abolitionists  changed tactics and began to concentrate on sending petitions to Congress to advocate for the end of slavery. Strategy of the Pamphlet Campaign The idea of mailing thousands of anti-slavery pamphlets into the slave states began to take hold in the early 1830s. The abolitionists couldnt send human agents to preach against slavery, as they would be risking their lives. And, thanks for the financial backing of the Tappan brothers, wealthy New York City merchants who had become devoted to the abolitionist cause, the most modern printing technology was made available to spread the message. The material produced, which included pamphlets and broadsides (large sheets designed to be passed around or hung as posters), tended to have woodcut illustrations depicting the horrors of slavery. The material may look crude to modern eyes, but in the 1830s it would have been considered fairly professional printed material. And the illustrations were particularly inflammatory to southerners. As slaves tended to be illiterate (as was generally mandated by law), the existence of printed material showing slaves being whipped and beaten was seen as particularly inflammatory. Southerners claimed the printed material from the American Anti-Slavery Society was intended to provoke slave uprisings. And knowing the abolitionists had the funding and personnel to turn out printed material of substantial quality was disturbing to pro-slavery Americans. End of the Campaign The controversy over censoring the mails essentially ended the pamphlet campaign. Legislation to open and search the mails failed in Congress, but local postmasters, with the tacit approval of their superiors in the federal government, still suppressed the pamphlets. Ultimately, the American Anti-Slavery Society came to realize that a point had been made. And the movement began to concentrate on other initiatives, most prominently the campaign to create strong anti-slavery action in the House of Representatives. The pamphlet campaign, within about a year, was essentially abandoned.

Friday, February 14, 2020

Advertisement Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words - 3

Advertisement - Essay Example The first advertising phase effectively increases the target clients’ knowledge of the products’ benefits. The same advertising pattern is grounded on the understanding that the target clients have prior direct experiences on products’ benefit. The target clients affirm that the main advertisement message is very convincing (cognition phase). The eye drops advertisements target a certain target market. The market is composed of current, future, and prior users of eye drops. The target clients know that eye drops will improve the eyes’ physical condition. Consequently, the target clients will accept (cognize) the advertisement’s message (Shimp & Andrew, 2013). Next, the muscle pain medicine convinces the advertisement viewers that the gel product will alleviate muscle pain. Again, the advertisement targets the current and prior users of muscle pain medicines. The same users are convinced that most muscle pain products successful improve the patients’ muscle pain symptoms. The product targets customers having flu-related symptoms. Most of the patients diagnosed with the same symptoms accept (cognize) the advertisement is truthful, delivering what the company advertises (Shimp & Andrew, 2013). Finally, the arthritis advertisement targets customers who are currently patronizing arthritis and related pain medications. The advertisement easily convinces the arthritis patients that using the product will lessen the painful joint pains generated by arthritis. The target advertisement viewers know that the product will make the product users start living a more pain-absent life. Regarding the efficacy of the product, the target clients have no doubts (Shimp & Andrew, 2013). The second phase focuses adding convincing relevant knowledge to the advertisements’ target clients. The three advertisements contribute additional beneficial knowledge to the target clients. The clients will know that there is a new competing product in the market. The